An inherent responsibility …

Humans now occupy or have seriously altered nearly all of the spaces outside our parks and preserves. Each of us carries an inherent responsibility to preserve the quality of earth’s ecosystems. When we leave the responsibility to a few experts (none of whom hold political office), the rest of us remain largely ignorant of earth stewardship and how to practice it. The conservation of Earth’s resources, including its living biological systems, must become part of the everyday culture of us all, worldwide.

― Douglas W. Tallamy, Nature’s Best Hope: A New Approach to Conservation That Starts in Your Yard

to learn more about stewarding our place in nature.

 

Join us this spring for the start to a growing season of eco-gardening classes and join in April’s Arboretum Reads discussion of Nature’s Best Hopeplus a wide variety of new classes to help you see your surroundings and your Arboretum through wise and loving eyes.  

Asynchronous (On-Demand) Classes

  • ONLINE | Asynchronous Class Open February 15 through April 30, 2024; With course materials and online discussion session. 

    Part I consists of six pre-recorded lectures with course materials. Videos and assignments for Part I will focus on different groups of vertebrate animals – fish, amphibians, and reptiles. 

    The Southern Appalachian Mountain region is quite diverse in the many different species of vertebrate animals that make their home here. In this series of classes, students will learn the basic identification and natural history of many of our mountain wildlife species. All six lectures of Part I are released asynchronously – or on demand – along with self-guided quizzes, worksheets, and other resources and will be available through April 30th in 2024. On-demand delivery allows participants to view the lectures at times most convenient for them, to pause and absorb the knowledge from the videos in ways best suited to different learning styles! Interactive opportunities to meet the instructor for an in-person Lunch & Learn discussion or an online Q & A will be hosted in March, also in connection with Vertebrate Zoology of the Blue Ridge Part II’s emphasis on birds and mammals.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONLINE | Asynchronous Class Open March 1 through May 31, 2024; With course materials and in-person and online discussion sessions. 

    Part II consists of six pre-recorded lectures focused on birds and mammals. Course materials are supplemented with an In-Person Lunch & Learn Discussion on Tuesday, March 12, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., and an Online Interactive Discussion Session on Tuesday, March 26, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., with Instructor Carlton Burke.

    The Southern Appalachian Mountain region is quite diverse in the many different species of vertebrate animals that make their home here. In this series of classes, students will learn the basic identification and natural history of many of our mountain wildlife species. All six lectures of Part I will be released asynchronously – or on demand – on March 1st and will be available through May 31st in 2024. On-demand delivery allows participants to view the lectures at times most convenient for them, to pause and absorb the knowledge from the videos in ways best suited to different learning styles! Then take advantage of interactive opportunities to meet Instructor Carlton Burke for an in-person Lunch & Learn discussion or an online Q & A.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONLINE | Asynchronous Series Open March 6 through May 31, 2024; With course materials and online discussion session.

    Ecological gardening is a way of thinking about the designed landscape in which gardens are no longer seen as a collection of plants, but as a community of complex interdependencies among plants, soils, environment and animals. Ecology-based methods used in design, site assessment, planning, planting and management are all covered in this comprehensive overview class presented online in pre-recorded lectures with Instructor Nina Shippen. Gardeners of all levels of interest and ability will find this foundational class valuable for learning ecologically-sustainable practices that can be adapted and applied in a variety of landscapes. 

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONLINE | Open March 19 through June 30, 2024. Consists of pre-recorded lectures with course materials. 

    Plants have many amazing abilities: they make their own food, pull water hundreds of feet in the air against gravity, and trick insects and other animals into helping them reproduce. They track the sun, recoil at a touch, and warn other plants of danger. In this class we will explore all these phenomena and more as we look at the basics of plant structure, function, evolution, classification, and ecology. The class is presented in an asynchronous lecture format with supplemental course materials. Discussion questions and practical exercises will be provided to reinforce the lecture material, including making observations in your own yard or neighborhood.  Instructor Alexandra Holland will be leading a series of botanizing and wildflower walks at the Arboretum this spring. Sign up separately for further reinforcement of her recorded lectures. 

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONLINE | Asynchronous Series Open April 1 through June 30, 2024

    Start off April — World Landscape Architecture Month — with inspired design! Landscape Architect and Visual Artist Preston Montague teaches this asynchronous fundamentals class that introduces participants to design principles, site assessment and planning, among other topics. Gain a better understanding of what comes into play in creating and managing sustainable and aesthetically appealing landscapes. You will come away empowered to be more creative, instinctive, decisive and purposeful in understanding good design and more adept at recognizing what’s not. The course includes two learning modules accessed online (asynchronous) along with an opportunity for live (synchronous) and lively discussion with the instructor and other participants.

    See Landscape Design Fundamentals: Approaches to Design, a live-time synchronous class and design charrette scheduled for Wednesday, April 24. There is also an in-person version of this class scheduled in May. Email adulteducation@ncarboretum.org for more information and a schedule. 

    LEARN MORE Here

April 2024

  • ONSITE | Saturday, April 13, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

    When we think of flowers in the spring, our attention often is turned towards the numerous showy flowers found on herbaceous plants on the forest floor. If we look upwards, however, we learn to notice the many species of mountain trees that also begin blooming at this time of the year as well. Naturalist Carlton Burke leads this two-hour field experience for practice identifying trees and woody shrubs by their blooms, buds and bark this time of year, and investigating tree structures and pollination strategies.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Saturday, April 13, 1 – 3 p.m.

    Spring is here, and the natural world is waking from its winter rest! Naturalist and botanist Alexandra Holland leads this wildflower walk at the Arboretum, pointing out the array of spring wildflowers emerging and in bloom. Learn some basics of wildflower ecology and identification while taking in the beauty of spring.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • FIELD | Saturday, April 13, 1 – 4 p.m.

    Southern Appalachian headwater streams are home to a great diversity of salamander species. Because salamanders are sensitive to environmental change, they may be used (along with macroinvertebrates) as biological indicators of stream health. Participants in this field experience taught by Naturalist/Educator Patrick Brannon will view a presentation on the biology of regional salamanders and then be given an opportunity to collect and identify species found in an stream onsite at the Station. Through data collected that day and previously, we will also examine the effects of microhabitat availability and water quality on salamander populations, interpreting graphs and using critical thinking skills to answer a variety of questions.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Tuesday, April 16, 10:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

    The recent upsurge in bluebird populations can largely be attributed to a movement of volunteer citizens establishing and monitoring bluebird nest boxes. Joe Sanders has been a bluebird protector for decades. His presentation gives an up close look at life in an active nest box and focuses on threats to bluebird survival. Wear sturdy shoes and appropriate clothing for a walk to various nesting sites on the Arboretum grounds and an outdoor demonstration on how to monitor bluebird nest boxes.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Thursday, April 18, 1 – 5 p.m.

    When we think of flowers in the spring, our attention often is turned towards the numerous showy flowers found on herbaceous plants on the forest floor. If we look upwards, however, we learn to notice the many species of mountain trees that also begin blooming at this time of the year as well. Naturalist Carlton Burke leads this half-day intensive that combines classroom lecture/discussion and applied time for practice identifying trees and woody shrubs by their blooms, buds and bark this time of year, and investigating tree structures and pollination strategies. Learn about trees in springtime in the Arboretum Forest.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE  | Thursday, April 18, 6 – 7:30 p.m.

    In recognition of April as World Landscape Architecture month, we invite Lauren Henry, curator of interpretation at Biltmore, to join us for a special Golden Hour Talk in the Arboretum’s Library. She celebrates the legacy of Frederick Law Olmsted, considered the “father of landscape architecture” in America, and discusses the far-reaching impact of his influence, including the idea for an arboretum located in Western North Carolina. 

    The landscapes of the present-day Biltmore Estate remain a testament to the man who envisioned them in the late 19th century: Frederick Law Olmsted, recognized as the father of landscape architecture in America. Biltmore continues to be a remarkably well-preserved example of Olmsted’s genius, as well as one of the last great works of his illustrious career as America’s “park maker.” Part of his unfulfilled vision for Biltmore included an arboretum of national importance—finally realized through the creation of The North Carolina Arboretum almost a hundred years later.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Friday, April 19, 1 – 3 p.m.

    With GPS built into our phones and cars, we are increasingly in danger of losing our ways of navigating. Expand your understanding of topographic and geologic maps with this course taught by Geologist Anton DuMars. An in-class portion will focus on an investigation of map symbols, scales, dates, color-coding, water features, and other attributes that are used to interpret data on topographic and geologic maps. Then the class will move outside for a skills session to interpret real-world features within a map, stepping off on some exploration at the Arboretum.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Saturday, April 20, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

    The BEETLES (Better Environmental Education, Teaching, Learning, and Expertise Sharing) learning sessions are active experiences crafted to encourage instructors to look at specific aspects of research-based science pedagogy and to inspire shifts in instructors’ thinking about their own teaching and learning. Developed by the Lawrence Hall of Science, these hands-on and interactive sessions promote a student-centered approach to help participants better engage with science and the natural world through inquiry. This workshop will focus on Making Observations and Field Journaling.

    This workshop is for educators (formal, nonformal, and higher education) who want to:

    • Explore different methods and model activities that can strengthen learners’ skills in making observations.
    • Engage in journaling activities and discuss the benefits of field journaling as a practice to support outdoor science learning.
    • Explore best practices for planning and implementing EE programs that foster learning and promote inclusivity.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Saturday, April 20, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

    When we think of flowers in the spring, our attention often is turned towards the numerous showy flowers found on herbaceous plants on the forest floor. If we look upwards, however, we learn to notice the many species of mountain trees that also begin blooming at this time of the year as well. Naturalist Carlton Burke leads this two-hour field experience for practice identifying trees and woody shrubs by their blooms, buds and bark this time of year, and investigating tree structures and pollination strategies.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Saturday, April 20, 2 – 5 p.m.

    Begin your Earth Day (April 22) festivities by celebrating spring while cultivating your relationship with Mother Earth, yourself, and others during this rejuvenating afternoon nature immersion retreat. Certified Guide Christa Hebal will lead you on a gentle journey through the spring forest, weaving mindfulness, breathwork, forest bathing (Shinrin Yoku) and nature therapy together for a restorative afternoon on some of the trails less traveled at the North Carolina Arboretum. We’ll celebrate the experience in community, enjoying a wild-foraged tea ceremony and snacks. Bring an open mind and an open heart. All are welcome. Presented through Adult & Continuing Education Programs in collaboration with Asheville Wellness Tours.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Tuesday, April 23, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

    Enrich your connection with nature through understanding and reflecting upon where you are “growing” in place. Ecologist and award-winning garden blogger Lisa Wagner encourages paying attention as the first step in starting a satisfying writing practice — whether journaling or blogging or just keeping notes on a planner — that you can sustain over time. Keeping a ​record of the land you steward or collecting observations on the routes or trails you walk become integral parts of your story. To help you get started, Wagner asks, “What inspires you now in your garden?” Or ​”What daily signs of spring do you see or hear or smell on your walks?” Participants will have opportunities to respond to writing prompts and experiment with combining ​w​ords and images to produce reflective and connective personal ​narrative. Bring your lunch and your laptop, or come analog, bringing an old-fashioned journal and pen! The Bent Creek Bistro is open to purchase lunch onsite at the Arboretum. Bring a brown bag lunch or order in from the Bent Creek Bistro.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONLINE | Wednesday, April 24, 6:30 – 8 p.m.

    Consider a new way of approaching design that will empower you to be more creative, more decisive and more purposeful with landscape challenges, whether it is developing a property master plan or designing the perfect mailbox garden. This evening discussion is open to all interested in good design and provides an opportunity for case study, creative brainstorming, and consultation with Landscape Architect and Visual Artist Preston Montague. If you signed on for the two-session asynchronous course with Preston, you’ll want to deepen the conversation in this engaging live-time design charrette, a fitting way to wrap up World Landscape Architecture Month in April.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Thursday, April 25, 1:30 – 3 p.m.

    The second in a new seasonal series of special topics in ecology continues a beloved Arboretum course. Naturalist Dan Lazar, who teaches the Ecology of the Blue Ridge course every fall, leads this walk and talk designed to point out signs of life awakening in springtime. Wildflowers are blooming, amphibians are mating, and birds are returning to their nesting habitats. Opportunities for learning in place are far from dormant in this or any season at the Arboretum!

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Thursday, April 25, 5:30 – 7 p.m.

    On any given day you will find Kate Rickenbacker adjusting, repairing, or restoring an old instrument or making a new instrument using the same time-tested techniques and traditional tools craftsmen of 200 years ago would have employed. We check in with Kate about the meaning of making music and the instrument on which it’s played. Here for this Golden Hour talk in the Education Center Library, surrounded by native trees at an Arboretum, we learn about how the wood of a spruce or a maple becomes a resonant violin or a viola with the maker’s touch and years of tradition.

    This talk is part of One Book, One Buncombe, a series of programs by the Buncombe County Public Library organized around a community read of The Violin Conspiracy by N.C. author Brendan Slocum.

    LEARN MORE Here

May 2024

  • ONSITE | Thursday, May 2, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.

    From the rare and fragrant Fraser fir of the highest elevations to the common white pine found throughout our region, the beautiful evergreen members of Pinaceae enrich our Appalachian Mountains. The class covers human uses of the pine family and their natural importance in our ecosystems. Also covered are species identification and natural history. The class begins indoors with lecture and discussion then moves outdoors for practice identifying native pines at the Arboretum.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • FIELD | Friday, May 3, 8 – 11 a.m.

    Enjoy an easy to moderate hike along the trails and paths at Sandy Mush Game Land. The mosaic of habitats here vary from open, managed cut-over areas to cove and riverine forests down along Sandy Mush & Turkey Creeks, and the French Broad River. Over the past few years, we’ve found them to be excellent for Prairie Warbler, Field Sparrow, Indigo Bunting and Yellow-breasted Chat, all of which are abundant. This is also the best spot in the county for Northern Bobwhite, which can often be heard calling from the fields and occasionally we get to see them. Other summer residents we’ll also be looking for include Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Acadian Flycatcher, White-eyed Vireo, Northern Parula, Hooded Warbler, Louisiana Waterthrush, Orchard Oriole, and Blue Grosbeak, and many others. Wild Turkeys are common year-round and several raptor species nest here as well. The woodlands and fields will be full of bird song and who knows what surprises we may find in this under-birded part of the county. Participants will be sent meeting instructions in advance.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • FIELD | Saturday, May 4, 8 a.m. – 2 p.m.

    Spring in eastern North America is the perfect time and place to find warblers. Many are arriving to breed, while others are on their way to breeding grounds farther north. At this time of year, their breeding plumage is stunning, and they are very vocal, with beautiful, easily recognizable songs. Join Kevin on the Blue Ridge Parkway to find migrating warblers and other neotropical migrants.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Saturday, May 4, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

    Project Learning Tree ® (PLT) is an award winning, multi-disciplinary environmental education program for educators and students in PreK-grade 12. PLT is a program of the Sustainable Forestry Initiative. It is one of the most widely used environmental education programs in the United States and abroad, and continues to set the standard for environmental education excellence.

    Join classroom and informal educators as we explore climate-related activities in Project Learning Tree’s Explore Your Environment K-8 Activity Guide and the secondary module, Southeastern Forests and Climate Change. Participants will also receive access to PLT’s Carbon & Climate E-Unit. This workshop is geared towards educators working with middle and high school students, but is open to anyone that is interested in the subject and materials.  This workshop qualifies for Criteria I in the EE Certification Program (K-12).

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Saturday, May 4, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.

    Celebrate the ephemeral beauty of flowers during this immersive morning nature retreat! In Japan, the birthplace of forest bathing (Shinrin Yoku), they celebrate the annual cherry blossom bloom (Sakura) with a practice known as Hanami, which translates to “contemplate the flowers.” This experience gently invites us to cultivate our attention and sensory awareness, while noticing the evanescent nature of flowering, both within and around us. Together, we will explore our relationships with native wildflowers, ourselves, each-other, and the more-than-human-world. 

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Tuesday, May 7, 9 – 10:30 a.m.

    The Blue Ridge Mountains are a beautiful place to be in springtime and this walk has been designed to visit some of the best spots to enjoy spring birding at the Arboretum with one of our expert guides. Bring your binoculars to explore the area’s avian bounty. Open to beginning and experienced birders alike

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Thursday, May 9, 1:30 – 3 p.m. 

    Learn about the journey through the colorful world of plant breeding from David Roberts, the Director of Plant Breeding at Bailey Innovations. (Fun fact: David’s journey in horticulture started at the North Carolina Arboretum! He interned and later worked as a bonsai assistant with the Arboretum’s Bonsai Curator, Arthur Joura.) From the earliest stages of breeding and trialing to bringing plants to market, David will provide an insider’s look at the pathway to introducing new hydrangea varieties in the First Editions® Shrubs & Trees and Endless Summer® Hydrangeas collections. You won’t want to miss learning about the pathway to introduction for the new First Editions® Eclipse® Bigleaf Hydrangea, one of the hydrangeas featured in the Bloom With a View displays! David made the initial cross, and he and his team worked on selecting, testing, trialing, and eventually introducing Eclipse®, the first true dark-leaf mophead hydrangea with dark leaves that stay dark season after season.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Two Sessions: Thursdays, May 9 & May 16, 1:30 – 4 p.m.

    What’s bugging you? In this two-part class and field trip taught by Naturalist Dan Lazar, we learn to recognize many of the region’s common insects, from ants and ant lions to house flies and butterflies. The class will investigate insect life cycles and ecology, covering the basics of insect anatomy and evolution of each order of insect found in the Southern Appalachians. Take a close-up look at one of the most common and colorful life forms of the Blue Ridge!

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Friday, May 10, 1 – 4 p.m.

    Gain a contemporary introduction to the art of Oshibana, a centuries-old tradition of making art with pressed plant materials. Discover Instructor Susan McChesney’s personal techniques of pressing, unpressing, storing, collaging and sealing plant material, with a focus on blooms from our area’s beautiful flower farms or from your own garden. Explore perspective, value and composition while collaging your own artwork. With your first floral creation with Susan, you might well decide to deepen your own practice of Oshibana, preserving and creating floral art! All supplies are included in the registration.

    This class has now sold out, join our waitlist here.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Friday, May 10, 6 – 8 p.m.

    Join us for this free event featuring poet, memoirist, and conservationist J. Drew Lanham. A MacArthur “Genius Grant” recipient, Dr. Lanham is the author of the memoir The Home Place: Memoirs of a Colored Man’s Love Affair with Nature, which received the Reed Award from the Southern Environmental Law Center and the Southern Book Prize. He is also the author of the poetry collections Sparrow Envy: Field Guide to Birds and Lesser Beasts and Joy is the Justice We Give Ourselves, both published by Hub City Press. An Alumni Distinguished Professor of Wildlife Ecology and Master Teacher at Clemson University, he and his family live in the Upstate of South Carolina, a soaring hawk’s downhill glide from the southern Appalachian escarpment that the Cherokee once called the Blue Wall. Dr. Lanham’s books will be available for purchase that evening through a partnership with Malaprop’s Bookstore in Asheville and Hub City Press in Spartanburg, S.C. A reception and signing will follow. 

    We’re sorry: This event is sold out. Please sign our Wait List so that we can be in touch with you if space opens or if we add a livestream option to attend virtually. Thank you for your interest!

    Join our Wait List

  • FIELD | Saturday, May 11, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

    All it takes is a short drive to discover botanical treasures, such as the bubblegum-flowered Rhododendron vaseyi, the pinkshell azalea! This endemic species grows only in a narrow range in the highlands of Western North Carolina. With bright trusses in colors ranging from snowy white to deep pink, the pinkshells put on one of the Blue Ridge Parkway’s most spectacular flower displays. Early May is the best time to go looking for these beautiful Rhododendron and the fantastic plants that grow alongside them, including mountain andromeda and the Carolina rhododendron, and an array of ephemeral wildflowers like trilliums, trout lilies, and bleeding-hearts. 

    Horticulturist and plant ecologist Carson Ellis, curator of the Arboretum’s National Native Azalea Garden, will lead this day-long field experience to convey the exceptional plant diversity of the Blue Ridge Parkway.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Saturday, May 11, 1 – 4 p.m.

    Our botany intensive will focus on the families of plants found commonly in Appalachia. We will cover the differences in how plants look regarding leaves, flowers, fruits and other parts and how this may help in proper identification. The way plants are classified based on these features and more recently DNA will be discussed relative to how they are referred to scientifically. We will also look at the best book and web resources for the exploration of botany in the region. A comprehensive slide lecture will cover the major characteristics of botany in general and apply learning when examining various forms of collected plant material.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Sunday, May 12, 1 – 4 p.m.

    Take away a better understanding of plant family patterns and what they indicate regarding identification and ethnobotanical application of exotic invasive plants for food, medicine and beauty. A big focus of this class led by Ethnobiologist Marc Williams will make clear the opportunities to employ these plants effectively, making use of a problem by turning it into a resource. Through a slide presentation and close up examination of collected plant material, we will become more familiar with some of the prime exotic invasive plants occurring in the southeastern U.S. as well as a more general exotic invasive plant list of over 150 useful species from the region.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Three Sessions: Wednesdays, May 15, 22 & 29, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. (Note new dates.)

    Landscape Architect Jennifer Verprauskus teaches this in-person version of our fundamentals class that introduces participants to design principles, site assessment and planning, among other topics. Participants will gain a better understanding of what comes into play in creating and managing ecologically sustainable and aesthetically appealing landscapes. Participants will have the opportunity to apply learning to create a master plan for their landscape or focus on one area of their landscape then share plans in design charrettes. When time and weather allow, the class will explore the Arboretum for examples of plants and design elements. Come away empowered to be more creative, instinctive, decisive and purposeful in understanding good sustainable design and more adept at recognizing what’s not.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Saturday, May 18, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.

    Learn the basics of natural dyeing in this introductory class with fiber artists Joyce Tromba and Pat Strang. Participants will explore how to prepare fiber for dyeing, which plants are best to use for natural dyeing and how to extract color from them. Hands-on time for the class includes setting up a dye pot and  practicing some simple resist techniques for a silk scarf. Then, while our cloth is simmering, we’ll head out to the Arboretum’s Heritage Garden to learn about dye plants commonly grown in Southern Appalachia and discuss ways to incorporate these in your garden planning!

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Saturday, May 18, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.

    Celebrate the ephemeral beauty of flowers during this immersive morning nature retreat! In Japan, the birthplace of forest bathing (Shinrin Yoku), they celebrate the annual cherry blossom bloom (Sakura) with a practice known as Hanami, which translates to “contemplate the flowers.” This experience gently invites us to cultivate our attention and sensory awareness, while noticing the evanescent nature of flowering, both within and around us. Together, we will explore our relationships with native wildflowers, ourselves, each-other, and the more-than-human-world. 

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Saturday, May 18, 1 – 3 p.m.

    Spring is here, and the natural world is waking from its winter rest! Naturalist and botanist Alexandra Holland leads this wildflower walk at the Arboretum, pointing out the array of spring wildflowers emerging and in bloom. Learn some basics of wildflower ecology and identification while taking in the beauty of spring.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Tuesday, May 21, 5:30 -7 p.m.

    Established in October 2005, the Bonsai Exhibition Garden is a signature feature of the Arboretum and a unique environment displaying up to 50 specimens at a time. Of particular importance are the plants native to the Blue Ridge, including American hornbeam, red maple and eastern white pine, which bring the thousand-year tradition of bonsai home to the mountains of Western North Carolina. Join this after-hours tour of the garden with Bonsai Curator Arthur Joura for a personal and informative overview of the art of bonsai and the Arboretum’s own creative approach. Foliage is at its freshest at this time of year, and flowers will likely be blooming in the garden landscape and on select bonsai.

    Participants must register in advance to attend this small-group experience hosted by Adult & Continuing Education Programs.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONLINE | Four Sessions: Tuesdays & Thursdays, May 28 – June 6, 10 – 11 a.m.

    In this class, explore how water flow across our diverse geological framework shapes the surface of our planet and life on it. Anton DuMars will investigate water flow across three physiographic provinces, including the Blue Ridge, Piedmont, Coastal Plains/Continental Shelf, and explain processes such as erosion, sediment transport, and formation of associated depositional environments.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Thursday, May 30, 2 – 3 p.m.

    You’ll be bug-eyed at the oversize insects on display in Bugs Outside the Box! Naturalist Dan Lazar, who teaches the Arboretum’s Ecology of Insects class, leads an engaging walk-through the exhibit, where you’ll see the exceptionally detailed and extraordinarily large insect sculptures of Lorenzo Possenti of Ecofauna. Showcasing the delicate beauty and intricate details not visible to the naked eye, Bugs Outside the Box educates about insect ecology and taxonomy, magnifying what might easily be overlooked!

    Bugs Outside the Box will be on view at the Baker Center Gallery from May 25th – September 8, 2024.

    LEARN MORE Here

  • ONSITE | Friday, May 31, 1 – 5 p.m.

    Spend an afternoon learning about woody plants with Ethnobiologist Marc Williams. This in-person intensive class begins with a presentation about major tree and shrub families. Then the class will head outside for a plant walk to learn how to identify a woody plant by fruits, leaves and other characteristics in the spring. Though identification can be more challenging once most of the woody plants are done blooming and leafing out, participants will learn confidence-building tips and techniques. Common and obscure uses for woody plants that may support overall health, well-being and sustenance will also be discussed. Participants should wear appropriate clothing for walking outside. 

    This class combines classroom lecture and field experience to count as the Spring Native Tree ID core requirement for the BRN Certificate of Merit.

    LEARN MORE Here

Grow in place with us this spring and in every season!


 

Adult & Continuing Education Programs & Classes are supported in part by Biltmore Farms HotelsThe Laurel of Asheville, Fjällräven Asheville and B.B. Barns Garden Center and Landscape Company.


 

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For more information, contact Adult & Continuing Education Programs at AdultEducation@ncarboretum.org